Author Topic: Diabolo for a job!  (Read 8505 times)

diabololi

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Diabolo for a job!
« on: November 27, 2004, 09:22:56 pm »
Hey all!
I've just come back from bluewater and I had a great time, I just practiced and performed around "Airborne Kites", a shop that sells juggling stuff, and the director saw me and offered me a job! Wehey! But not until I'm 16 (June)  :(   When I'm 18, I want to do a degree in circus skills up in London. And maybe see what turns up. My dream job would be to teach juggling (in all its' forms).

Do any you diabolo/juggle for a living? Is it feasible?

Thanks
Oli

MattF

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2004, 09:31:06 pm »
congrats on getting the job. I am sure you could make a living out of it if you put in enough time and effort.  I didn't know there was a degree in circus skills, but good luck with it if you decide to take that path.

Arjan

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2004, 10:12:23 pm »
I don`t juggle or teach juggeling for a job. Had a done a few workshops, and still working on my teaching skills. Preforming is also a way to live, a great way. Also working on it, but that`s far away.

But doing something like that is very cool but also very dependent. You often don`t have enough money possebly. It`s a fear you need to commit to. But one of the greatest ways to live!

diabololi

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2004, 10:27:53 pm »
Yeh, I guess I wouldn't be too worried about times with no income, I've got a friend who used to build computers for his friends and their friends etc. He was happy, but he wanted to move on and get a higher income. He got a job in a computer building company and he seems very stressed and doesn't have time for much.

Oli

Arjan

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2004, 10:35:07 pm »
So now you assemble personal computers? I think you should face the fear ;) If you have the chance, take it!

diabololi

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2004, 09:24:57 am »
no, my friend does  :)

Arjan

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2004, 12:15:09 pm »
I don`t understand.. you don`t have to worrie about money because a friend of you.... bla bla bla  :?

diabololi

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2004, 04:38:43 pm »
meh, dont worry, pretend I didn't post it  :P

diabolumberto

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2004, 04:55:43 pm »
I know just one person who play diabolo to win money...It's Tony Frebourg
Trick of the week : http://diabolumberto.free.fr

Sean

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2004, 05:00:16 pm »
Hey Diabolumberto - great to see you here. Welcome! :D

If I remember correctly, Ryo Yabe works full time (just over the summer?) with diabolos at the the Disney World in Tokyo.

diabolumberto

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2004, 05:04:03 pm »
Yes, there are lot of player who win their life with diabolo, but I've never seen their guys...

There Tony, Ryo Yabe, Matt Hall, Lena Kohn etc.....
Trick of the week : http://diabolumberto.free.fr

Sean

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2004, 05:10:37 pm »
Quote from: diabolumberto
There Tony, Ryo Yabe, Matt Hall, Lena Kohn etc.....


True... although Matt Hall works full time as a High School teacher and performs on the side. I'm sure there are times when he'd love to have more time to devote to the practice and performing of juggling/diabolo. Matt - you out there? Your thoughts?

Sean

Ron

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Juggling for a living
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2005, 06:57:41 pm »
Juggling for a living is not only feasible, but it can be very rewarding on several different levels. Team Rootberry just had an excellent article in JUGGLE Magazine. The biggest thing I have found, and I am now in my 6th year, is that you have to spend a lot of time doing everything else but juggling. Things such as promotion, writing new material, handling contracts, taxes, etc. all require a lot of attention. You also have to figure out what your market is and distinguish yourself in it. It takes alot of patience the first couple of years and you will need other ways to supplement your income until you have established your reputation. Networking with other professionals, passing gigs, learning everything you can about performing, adding new skills, and a list too long for this posting will help you find jobs that will lead to other work.  Technical skill is just the beginning if you want to do this for a living. Finally, you just have to go for it! If I hadn't done this, I would have spent the rest of my life wondering if I could have. Now I know!  Good luck and break a leg!

ronnie2tone

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2005, 09:01:22 pm »
Just a wee note on qualifacations in juggling.

I spent a year in Madrid, Spain and practised some evenings at a place where they did degrees. It's called Carampa and can be found in the middle of Madrid's biggest Park, Casa del Campo. The juggling and acrobatic skill there was mind blowing!  :shock:  :shock:  

http://www.carampa.com/   (Spanish)

During my year there I got the overall impression that Spain looked on these type of skills as being more mainstream, defnately more so than the UK.
Tossing the diabolo on a daily basis!

staticjuggler

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!!
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2005, 10:59:01 pm »
Good job Oli! Now I am really jealous :oops:

I should look for places around here  that would need a juggler to attract attention for their business. Diabolo sure does. I'm 15 and have nothing better to do in my spare time (other than juggle)!

Static
www.staticjuggler.com

How mad would a wood chuck get if a big neon pink Koala bear named Ishtar ran into the woods and chucked all the wood before the woodchuck could chuck the wood?

kamikace

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woa!
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2005, 12:59:03 am »
¡Hola Ronnie! I´m from madrid and sometimes I go to Carampa, I did´t think so until you have told :P . I´m always think in Spain we don´t make juggling seriusly, just for hobby in the most people, for example I know abuot good diabolist, but do you know (any of you) about any spanish diabolist? .... :oops:  er... :wink:  if come, don´t forget there´s one mate!
¿Sabes hablar español?   8)
Rooted diabolist.

tetsuya

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2005, 03:03:17 pm »
ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh...
I'm from sicily, and here thre'are no  jugglers.. But my girlfriend is from spain, and I've been there realy a lot of time just to find out a real good diabolist... Where were you????
I did'nt find anybody!
I wish we can meet there next time... I will be there for the fayas in Valencia...

kamikace

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #17 on: January 24, 2005, 05:57:03 pm »
Hi tetsuya, I´m from Pinto, a city about 20 km south from the capital city. I haven´t been never in fallas! :roll:  :oops: In Cádiz there´s Iván, which is a good diabolist, in barcelona there are well ones too. Is your girlfriend who appears in your video? lol :)
see you soon
 8)
Rooted diabolist.

Chiok

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2005, 08:11:12 pm »
I know Airtime Kites, my parents lived nearby and I used to work in the cinema in Bluewater.  Though I tried to get a job in there but they didn't seem interested, though my diabolo and yoyo skills have improved.  Nice place though, I'd like to have the time to play about in there.

As for degree in circus skills, you should talk to Norbi, I think he's planning on taking a course in Juggling in a school in london.  I do believe it can be taken as a course, either a BA or a HND or something.  From what I understand though, it's pretty hardcore.  Not just for jugglers but other performing arts such as gymnastics, balancing, stage and such.  Exams take the form of end of semester performances I believe.

Very interesting though, I must agree, have a lil google search on it, I'm sure you'll find what I'm talking about.

Chiok
www.gravityvomit.co.uk - Gravity pulls down, we throw up.
University of Bath Juggling and Circus Skills

norbi

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2005, 08:32:33 pm »
Airtime rocks, its my local shop, Richie is cool, i doubt he would have been unimpressed, but he doesnt need any people working there. He or his wife can can cover most times, and he has another guy (called Robin if you care) that can cover any bad times. Yeah just dont feel bad becuase he wouldnt hire you, also he doesnt sponsor anyone either.

As for the circus course, part2 of the audition are Dance and Drama, 2 things i dont do, so i think i will give it a miss. Maybe goto the one in Berlin instead, i hope to move over there next year for a few months. If anyone is interested in the Degree in London (and they should be, some of the best have come through there) then check out http://circusspace.co.uk/
towards the end of the second year they help with getting a 20 minute (or something similar) act that can be sold across the world, and help with publicity etc, worth the time (if you can dance/act AT ALL, even a little bit, badly)

hope that helps

Matt

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Diabolo for a job!
« Reply #20 on: January 26, 2005, 01:25:39 am »
In response to Diabolumberto and Sean,

Here's my brief history:

1997--Started juggling seriously after I bought Charlie Dancey's Encyclopedia of Ball Juggling.  I started diabolo around the same time.  Actually, balls and diabolo were my two first props.  I had a purple piece o crap diabolo, but I loved it.  Later that year I got a job working at a toy store to cover the Christmas sales, but all I ended up doing is juggling in front of the store and greeting customers.  I only made about $10 an hour, but for me I was really stoked to essentially be paid to juggle. It was my first experience of that kind, and I was stoked.  My real job at the time was Public Affairs Officer for the Consulate General of Japan in Chicago.  Nice title, eh?  

1998--performed in my first public show at MadFest.  So, basically, a year later.  And I performed in every public show at every festival I attended after that.  That streak ended last year when I attended Damento festival here in California and didn't perform in the public show.

2000--finished my masters at Stanford and for the summer got a job juggling at Paramount's Great America Amusement Park in San Jose.  Up to that time I had done a birthday party or two, some local gigs for small money, but this was my first "big time" juggling job.  I spent that whole summer walking around the park entertaining the guests and performing warm-up acts before the main attractions.  During my breaks, I just practiced and hung out with the dancers.  It was heaven.  I'd do that type of summer job in a second.  After that summer finished, I started teaching Japanese at Silver Creek High School, where I still teach happily to this day.  

2003--Silver Medal in IJA doing diabolo for half the routine.  Invite to EJC 2003 in Svendborg, where I met the Mad French Posse, Thomas Dietz, and a million other studly Europeans.    

2004--Invite to BJC 2004 in Derby.  Met Norbi for the first time along with Ben Beever, Peter Bone, and Barnesy.  Invite to WJF.  

2005--Invite to Scottish 2005 in Glascow.  I wonder who I'll meet there?   :D

As you can see, I have actually made very little money juggling.  However, I have had a rich juggling life, so to speak, and I'm grateful for the opportunity to travel to all these different places and meet all these great folks.  

Given that Root and Bill and Ivan and Scotty Cavanaugh are all my best friends, I've been surrounded by true professionals for years now.  I've had talks about going pro with Dan Holzman (of the Raspyni Brothers), Rhys Thomas, and Robert (ButterflyMan) Nelson, as well as my homeboys listed above.  Everyone has encouraged me to take that step if that's what I want to do.  I've been tempted, but knowing how hard those guys work and hustle to make their living, I pass.  It's a fun job, but it's still a job.  For me, juggling is a passionate hobby, but still just a hobby.  I'd rather make consistent, okay money teaching Japanese (which I love doing), have full insurance coverage paid for by my school, and then try and get invited to festivals all over the world.  

Moreover, if you're going to make a living juggling, you almost have to have comedy in your act, and I'm not good at that.  I could get better (like anything, comedy is an acquired skill that comes with practice and trial/error), but I would rather spend my time juggling and teaching.  I respect the pros.  I'm an amateur, at least in my own mind.   The true pros work HARD.  Every once in a while, I hear one of Ivan's stories about being on a cruise, Rootberry talking about some gig in Lebanon, or Scotty (who's in Japan this very second) and I think maybe.........

For now, I'm sticking with the teaching.  However, given the state of education in America (under Bush) and in California (under the Terminator), I might go the juggling route!  It's nice to know that path is open if I decide to walk it.  

A bit of a novel, but that's where I stand.  Tony and Ryo are studs.  

Matt
Many Thanks to Sean for all his work and inspiration.  Respect to the MFP!