Author Topic: How do you learn  (Read 5316 times)

Wis

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Re: How do you learn
« Reply #20 on: February 10, 2016, 12:28:28 pm »
Some comments from my side.

I think yes, the content of the article makes sense, and for us, diabolo players, changing the gear from time to time is seen as a bad idea. But I truly think that using different gear forces you to adapt, and adapting is nothing more (at least to me) than knowing better a part of your system, and tweak it. Slightly related to this, sometimes you make a trick, in a different way than most of the people, and you are comfortable with the trick. But then one day you start feeling that something is more natural to you, eventually you realize you are moving your hands more "like most of the people". I think those small adjustments are the ones that can benefit from changing the gear from time to time.
I am reluctant to believe a single study and the six hours gap probably is not so strict, or maybe not even there, but for me that part is less relevant.

Concerning not so routinary training... for me, the key is motivation. Also for sport, I do not demand too much from myself, because I know myself, and then I rather avoid running. And with juggling I try to have a middle term. I have a set of things I force myself to practice (but I actually do not need to force myself much, I by default already want to do 3D tricks), but I try to leave the doors quite open to what I am going to train on.

So basically, I am trying to insinuate that routine may be an enemy of fun, for some. And that I believe in learning through fun, a lot.

Agree with Arjan. I watched a related thing and I might as well leave it here (I do not even know the guy, so I am not making ad or whatever), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuH1izP2Eac. The sentence I like the most (not literal) is "it needs to feel like if your body is not comfortable with that trick", then you can assume you are learning. (not to confuse with "I feel completely lost in this trick")
I realize this is slightly in apparent contradiction with the "having fun" rule I said, but that is only apparent. Everybody have fun when trying the first flash of a trick you cannot do, and I think we lose this kind of happiness with time because, and now I am speculating like crazy, in big part because we are obsessed with the final result. In our days I believe the amount of people that enjoys the process of learning is too little, and the amount of people that just learn thinking of the final goal is basically almost everybody. This is a wildly intuitive remark, so feel free to complain :)
"The string...the inertia...the hours"

Brian60158

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Re: How do you learn
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2016, 11:42:17 pm »
The way I learn a trick faster is just by doing it over and over again until I give up and then when I want to start again I pretty much get it because I did it so much at a time I memorize  what I did wrong.

Wis

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Re: How do you learn
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2016, 08:07:03 am »
Concerning the breaks, I have a long term fight with 3 diabolos, I was able to do it more or less ok on 2009. I got many wrist problems. It is 2016, and I still can't do any trick solidly. Only hover, I know, sad as f***.
I was able to make a proper 3D sun 1 out of 5 max. I broke my finger, and I got  break of 2 months. After coming back I kind of felt better control of the 3D. Yesterday I was able to do 3 suns 4 out of 5.
It seems to me that these long breaks allow you to, maybe on top of other things, "forget" some details of the motion. And then when you need to "re-learn" them, you are already more familiar with the whole motion, and then you are more likely to get it right. Breaks seem to have also a consolidating effect for other things one may be training, but that I cannot explain at such level of detail.
"The string...the inertia...the hours"