Author Topic: OED Diabolo entry  (Read 3552 times)

tomangleberger

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OED Diabolo entry
« on: September 12, 2006, 03:58:47 pm »
I looked up DIABOLO in the OED online today and it raised a lot of questions. Please excuse me if these things are common knowledge in Europe. I'm not well-read in diabolic literature....

 The game of the devil-on-two-sticks revived under this name. Also, the wooden top with which the game is played. Hence di{sm}abolist, a player of the game.
>> Devil-on-two-sticks? So was it really named after "devil," meaning "A name of various instruments or mechanical contrivances."
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1907 C.B. Fry's Mag. --The diabolo game can be played by sides of almost any number.

>>What was the diabolo game?

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1907 Westm. Gaz. 25 Sept. 12/1 The inventor of the modern Diabolo is M. Gustave Phillipart, a French engineer, well known in the automobile world.

>> This guy should be our patron Saint, but I've never heard of him what did he do?
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 1922 C. E. M. JOAD Highbrows iv. 135 They invent some quaint form of amusement like diabolo or roller-skating.

>> QUAINT?? Who wrote this Jason Garfield?

Mattias

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2006, 04:27:03 pm »
Excerpt from a thing I wrote for school:

Diabolo has its origins in ancient China (2000-3000 B.C.). In those days the game received several different names. During the Han dynasty (206 B.C.) it was given the name “Kouen-Gen”, this roughly translates to “make the hollow bamboo stick whistle”. In China the diabolos have always been made out of bamboo and have holes in their cylindrical hubs that make the diabolo whistle when spin is added. The name Diabolo comes from the expeditioners who brought the game to Europe. They put the Greek words Dia (through) and Ballo (throw) together to form the word Diaballo.
In France the game became well accepted and after a while it received the same status as tennis. Clubs were formed starting from the year 1810 and several competitions were held. Diabolo became quite a fashionable thing to practice. In 1906 the diabolo took a huge step towards what it has become today. The Frenchman Gustave Philippart made a diabolo-like object out of a tire, with both metal and rubber as its components, as it is now. Sadly enough the world wars of the 20th century made the popularity of diabolo decline to only a vast number of practicians. It was 35 years after WWII end that the diabolo started to rise from its ashes. With new innovative designs it once again gained popularity in France and Great Britain, much thanks to the new more trick-friendly design.
During the 1990’s the possibility of two diabolos were discovered and quite soon after that people started working with three diabolos.


I don't know what source I used and didn't bother looking it up, it was good enough for my english teacher. Maybe it was some help.
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GbH

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2006, 06:28:03 pm »
Quote from: Mattias

During the 1990’s the possibility of two diabolos were discovered and quite soon after that people started working with three diabolos.



1990's should read 1980's.

Mark BMC

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2006, 06:48:52 pm »
"diabolo decline to only a vast number of practicians"?

mind you my Swedish isn’t to hot so I’m probably being pedantic.Interesting  post  :D

Sharpes

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2006, 07:05:25 pm »
I saw a picture of the diabolo tennis game in a book somewhere. It involves a huge, hourglass shaped court, two sections on each side(one smaller, one larger), and the players hold the string parallel to the length of the court and throw it back and forth
Jacob and Nate Sharpe

tomangleberger

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2006, 12:18:22 am »
Quote from: GbH
Quote from: Mattias

During the 1990’s the possibility of two diabolos were discovered....


1990's should read 1980's.


This led me to look up the diabolo section in the uber-annoying Complete Juggler.
Published in 1987, it doesn't show anyone doing 2 diabolos, but does show someone doing 3 low!
(As usual, the book just drops three low in there as if it was a trick you could learn over the weekend.)

So, when was 3 low invented? (Yes, i searched for it, couldn't find it.)

Martijn

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2006, 12:39:01 pm »
Quote from: tomangleberger
So, when was 3 low invented? (Yes, i searched for it, couldn't find it.)

Have a look in here: http://www.diabolo.ca/forum/viewtopic.php?p=18351&highlight=low#18351

It might answer your question? (I searched for "3 and low", author: gbh, displayed as posts)
download Made in Taiwan at www.arjangroenendijk.nl

donald grant

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2006, 07:28:27 pm »
Musty old diabolo history lesson coming up.....

When Guy referred to the 1980s being the pioneering time for two diabolos, he meant the european style of doing two diabolos (e.g. self starting, correcting, and tricks on the string).  The grand-daddy of all this was Jochen Schell, so we all owe him big-time.  Guy was the big pioneer here in the UK, that's why he helped me out so much for the "Two Hot to Handle" book which came out in 1993.  And contrary to popular belief, Guy helped with the whole book, not just the 3 diabolo section.  (yes, he got a share of the royalties, before anyone asks!)

Before all of this, of course, the chinese had been doing two diabolos for centuries.  The problem with chinese diabolos is that they are ridiculously hard to correct, so the skills were mostly of a two-high and acrobatic sort.

Likewise three diabolos, there are plenty of photos and drawings of girls doing three low from long ago.  It's always done with someone else throwing the extra diabolos in as they are so hard to self-start.

And four high has been around for ages too.  That's four high with heavy wood and bamboo diabolos.  Fearless stuff....

Donald

tomangleberger

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2006, 12:30:11 am »
Quote from: donald grant
Musty old diabolo history lesson coming up.....

Before all of this, of course, the chinese had been doing two diabolos for centuries.
...Likewise three diabolos...
Donald


Thanks a lot for the history lesson!
I'd always thought it curious that  Chinese diabolists would have failed to think of doing two after centuries of practice.

Wish I'd had your book instead of the Complete Juggler back when I was a'learning...

Martin_

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2006, 07:47:12 pm »
Forgive my ignorence but has 4 low ever been accomplished?
Surely with a fast enough shuffle and a decent string length its physcially possible?

Martijn

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OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2006, 12:01:06 am »
Yeap, I saw the best shuffles at this years EJC, in Millstreet. Lucas was throwing in the 4th diabolo for Guillaume (sp?), which managed to get around 20(ish) otts! The shuffle was perfect, so so beautiful.
download Made in Taiwan at www.arjangroenendijk.nl

DiaboloWebb

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Re: OED Diabolo entry
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2006, 08:01:07 pm »
aww man, that'd be sweet to see, got any idea where i can find a video?
ALIENS ARE COMING TO ABDUCT ALL THE GOOD LOOKING AND SEXY PEOPLE.

  YOU WILL BE SAFE; I'M JUST WRITING THIS TO SAY GOODBYE.