Author Topic: Permanantly white diabolo ?  (Read 9535 times)

Crackers

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Permanantly white diabolo ?
« on: May 22, 2008, 03:32:14 pm »
I just remembered a physics lesson I had ages ago. Basicly we were coloring a sort of rainbow on a piece of round paper then make it spin on itself quite fast. We ended up seeing white ...
Sorry I don't really know how to explain, I'm sure most of you know what I'm talking about  :P
I was wondering if a diabolo was painted this way, would it always look perfectly white while spinning (even with dirt on it) ?
If not it could still be interesting to try a sticker like that in the inside of the cups ...

Anyone as ideas about that ?

mellowscholar

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2008, 07:36:58 pm »
It would be interesting to see if it did work on a diabolo. The reason it appears white, for those who are interested, is because white light is made up from all of the colours of the visible spectrum, by blurring the colours together, you can trick the eyes/brain into believing that they're seeing white.

Crackers, thinking on it I think the dirt would screw up the effect a little bit because from that bit of diabolo, the right colour light is not reflected but brown or dark grey light instead. But i think it would only show up as much as a stain or mark does normally on a diabolo.

The stripes of colour would have to be parallel to the axle too, so that they blur together, on the outside of the cups anyway.

William

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2008, 12:29:23 am »
I'd like to see it.
Watching the colour change would be pro.
William - YouTube! "NO! If they're blue, you should not touch your nuts." - Aaro

Aaron Z

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2008, 04:04:28 am »
Rainbow-Harlequins sure as hell don't look white, but I guess that's because the colors are not arranged against the axle or whatever.

I remember mixing all the different paint colors in primary school, and getting a gross brown, so it would be cool to see something new with mixing colors.

Shaun

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2008, 05:17:58 am »
Give it a try. You know you want to...
Then tell me if it works ;)

mellowscholar

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2008, 09:17:37 am »
I remember mixing all the different paint colors in primary school, and getting a gross brown, so it would be cool to see something new with mixing colors.

Paint and light mix quite differently, that's why their primary colours are different RYB for paint and RGB for light.

Squiggle

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2008, 06:08:17 pm »
I'll play around with it this weekend. If I can't make anything crappy/stupid I'll see if I can just make a quick animation at school to see how it works ofc, I can only imagine being able to do it on the inside of the cups.

Jonny_

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2008, 08:14:33 pm »
it would have to be a bearing

mellowscholar

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2008, 08:56:21 pm »

Dan

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2008, 09:50:55 pm »
The principle could work but would it not just be the same as having a plain white diabolo?  Ye sure at slower speeds you could see the colours but im pretty certain it would confuse the hell out of an audience (as if they aren't confused enough by what we do already!).  Ill get some electrical tape out and see if i can get anything to work - might be tough on crystal suns though  :-\  Ill go raid my cupboard of old circus's  ;)


Dan

Crackers

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2008, 10:09:24 pm »
Appreciate everyone trying ^^
I'm curious about the speed you need to have this effect going on

mellowscholar

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2008, 12:09:59 pm »
crackers, with the colours that you saw on the piece of paper, were they all blurred together? or were they like distinct stripes of colour?

JimmyCords.

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2008, 12:31:44 pm »
They would be distinct stripes of colour. It would still be cool to have a rainbow coloured diabolo, or at least the inside of the cups, that turns white when it spins for performances.
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Crackers

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2008, 03:05:17 pm »
Yes they were distinct.

It would also give an other wow factor for kids ^^

mellowscholar

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2008, 05:11:15 pm »
Aha, that makes it easier/cheaper. I'd love to see this in practice on a diabolo.

Chiok

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2008, 12:28:53 pm »
It would work, as long as your dirt was rainbow coloured too.  Can't help dirt sticking to the cups.  But you've got the right idea and it would work as mellowscholar has illustrated.

Chiok
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University of Bath Juggling and Circus Skills

zwiggelbig

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2008, 03:30:02 pm »
It would be interesting to see if it did work on a diabolo. The reason it appears white, for those who are interested, is because white light is made up from all of the colours of the visible spectrum, by blurring the colours together, you can trick the eyes/brain into believing that they're seeing white.

Crackers, thinking on it I think the dirt would screw up the effect a little bit because from that bit of diabolo, the right colour light is not reflected but brown or dark grey light instead. But i think it would only show up as much as a stain or mark does normally on a diabolo.

The stripes of colour would have to be parallel to the axle too, so that they blur together, on the outside of the cups anyway.

What if you did it on the same cup material as sundia fly's I don't belive they get dirty fast..

Eric Moffett

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2008, 05:20:21 pm »
you need all red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet? or just red, yellow, green?
Diabolo Acquired - Thurday, 2/08/07
Vertax Skill Acquired - Thursday, 4/12/07
2 Diabolo Skill Acquired - Tuesday, 5/29/07
3 Diabolo Skill Acquired - Eh, No?

cereal

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2008, 08:28:02 pm »
you need all red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet? or just red, yellow, green?
yes u need all that's the point of the spectrum  ;)

Sean

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Re: Permanantly white diabolo ?
« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2008, 09:14:46 pm »
yes u need all that's the point of the spectrum  ;)
Um no, you wouldn't. 3 would do. The others are a combination of those and would be redundant.

http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/phy00/phy00660.htm
Quote from: Vince Calder
it is the response time of cones and rods in the eye. When a wavelength of light strikes the retinal, that "signal" decays in about 1/25 sec. The superposition of tri-color stimuli (typically yellow, cyan, and magenta) "excites" all of the rods and cones, giving the visual perception of white light (approximately). So the sectors of the color wheel must rotate quickly enough so that each color segment superimposes the other two in 1/25 of a second or less. The shading will change if the speed is increased or decreased slightly.

and

Quote from: ProfHoff 643
If the color wheel is not spun fast enough, individual colors can be seen. As the spin-speed increases, the colors will blend, This happens because, as the image is formed on the retina of the eye, the retinal sensors become temporarily overloaded with the stimuli provided by the three colors. The overload is sometimes referred to as "persistence of vision" -- that is, the sensors are unable to respond and clear themselves for the next stimulus if the stimuli events occur too quickly. Thus, all sensors are firing simultaneously and the resulting signal sent to the brain is the blended colors, namely white.


The purity of the blend (white) depends on the purity of the three primaries. This works better if the blend is produced by colors derived when white light is passed through a prism.

http://www.google.com/search?q=spinning%20colors%20white

I think this could definitely work. Maybe it could even work with just 3 big stripes of colour if it's spun fast enough? If the strips weren't evenly spaced the whole way out (i.e. they were parallel as if on a flat plane and you had more of them as you moved out), then the outside would look white before the inner sections. That would be neat too.