Author Topic: Increasing exposure time  (Read 7454 times)

Eric Moffett

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Increasing exposure time
« on: August 01, 2007, 12:20:29 AM »
Since I've got light kits now, and I was wondering how to increase the exposure time because my motion trails are short =/
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Sean

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2007, 12:24:32 AM »
That might depend just a *little* bit on what camera you are using. ;)

Eric Moffett

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2007, 12:30:41 AM »
I was looking for a more generic this is usually what to look for, etc. but ok...

Well most likely my sisters camera, but sometimes my neighbors so I'll get the specs on my neighbors later.

My sisters camera is a Canon Powershot A620
Diabolo Acquired - Thurday, 2/08/07
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2 Diabolo Skill Acquired - Tuesday, 5/29/07
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Sean

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2007, 12:39:25 AM »
Well, a quick search of the Canon site came up with this link to the user manual:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/368yxk

That might be of help.

For non-SLR digital cameras, you can often increase exposure time through the menu options. That's about as generic as it gets.

Matt_

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2007, 09:28:51 AM »
That particular camera has a ton of modes--put it on M mode and away you go. Read your manual too ;)

Alex!

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2007, 12:25:40 PM »
Increasing the aperature will change the amount of light in the picture, the higher the aperature the brighter the picture. To get long trails it would be best to choose the option of a very slow shutter speed. Obviously don't use flash and take the picture on self timer while it is on a stable tripod or table otherwise the picture will be really shaky.
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Chiok

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2007, 02:45:05 PM »
This is normally labelled on digital cameras as the ISO setting.  The smaller the number, the longer the exposure (I think, possibly the other way around).  More fancy cameras actually have an exposure time instead of an ISO number, but it's the same thing.  On a Canon Powershot, you do need to be the "M"anual mode as Matt says, but the manual will explain all of this.

Chiok
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Alex!

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2007, 05:29:52 PM »
Yeah your right Chiok. On my camera I can only change the ISO setting on the Manual menu. The higher the number the longer the exposure though. I normally set mine to '400' when taking pictures where I want a blurred (light trail) effect. With taking photos at night of a city view I would set the ISO down to '50' and the aperture down to '-1' to get a nice clear picture without over exposing, but thats just whats best for my camera.

I like photography :)
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Eric Moffett

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2007, 06:56:06 PM »
Ok cool, and the reason I asked is because I'm sure my sister doesn't know, and it's her camera anyways so I was just to lazy to get the manual from her, and figure it out myself, when I knew people already knew how to =b thanks for the help I will mess around with it and see what I can come up with, after my GE's come in
Diabolo Acquired - Thurday, 2/08/07
Vertax Skill Acquired - Thursday, 4/12/07
2 Diabolo Skill Acquired - Tuesday, 5/29/07
3 Diabolo Skill Acquired - Eh, No?

David - SAS1

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2007, 02:44:43 PM »
The Iso isn't the exposure time, the Iso is the speed of the film at recording light and uses a rating that is given to film to depict how grainy you want the film to be, for diabolo shots between 200 and 800 should be ok.  The appature number normally has an "F" before the number, the larger the number the less light is let in.  The shutter speed is measured in a fraction of a second e.g. 1/4, 1/60, 1/125.  You would probably want to use lengthen the shutter speed then let the camera automatically adjust the ISO and set the apperture at about f4-8.
This may sound way to technical but I hope it helps.
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Rob_

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Re: Increasing exposure time
« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2007, 01:46:08 PM »
you want to select the mode on your camera that is shutter priority,

best not to fiddle with the aperture unless your very good with cameras, cos it will just be out of focus  ;)

youll want to use the slowest shutter speed so about 1/2 a second would produce a very good shot with long trails :)

 

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